Creating Climate Change for the Medical Workplace: Lessons on physician work-life balance from around the world

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Click here to watch the webinar (One hour long, recorded Thurs. April 29, 2010)

Presenters:
Janet Dollin MDCM, CCFP, FCFP
Kathleen Gartke, MD, FRCSC
Barbara Lent  MD, CCFP, FCFP
Cheryl Levitt MBBCh, CCFP, FCFP

The current reality of Canadian physician demographics will require men and women to collaborate to optimize clinical care through innovative ways of organizing clinical work and academic responsibilities.

Presenters will look at international data in context with what we have learned in Canada to ensure healthy medical workplaces, to improve gender equity in the ranks and within leadership, and to build family-friendly workplaces within our institutions.

The goal is for webinar participants to discover the relevance of these international reports to Canada and to their own workplace, reflect on evolving attitudinal shifts, gain deeper understanding across generations and consider possible individual and institutional responses to the issues raised.

Production of this event has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

Women, Gender & Disaster: What’s the Connection? Webinar

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Click here to watch the webinar (One hour long, recorded March 31st, 2010)

Canadian Women’s Health Network and Prairie Women’s Health Centre of Excellence welcome Dr. Elaine Enarson, a disaster sociologist and a founding member of Gender and Disaster Network Canada. Enarson’s personal experience in Hurricane Andrew sparked extensive work on disaster vulnerability and resilience. She writes widely on the role of gender in disasters, from the way that women and men experience the effects of an emergency and its aftermath differently, to the ways that women’s skills are used (or not used) in the rebuilding process.

For those interested in learning more about gender and disaster, a list of additional resources compiled by Dr. Enarson will be available here. Check back soon!

Endocrine Disruption Webinar

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Gender-bending and Environmental Justice: The Way We Talk About Endocrine Disruption 
             
Click here to watch the webinar (One hour long, recorded Thursday March 18)

Dayna Nadine Scott, co-director of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health, will discuss the environmental health effects of long-term, low-dose exposure to pollutants, with a focus on the Aamjiwnaang First Nation reserve near Sarnia, ON. This community, in the midst of Canada’s largest petro-chemical complex, has seen a drastic decline in male newborns in recent years.

Production of these events has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

The Push to Prescribe - Webinar

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Meet some authors of the new book, The Push to Prescribe, for an online discussion about women and Canadian drug policy

Click here to watch the webinar (1 hour long, recorded Wednesday Nov. 4, 2009)

Drugs are produced, regulated, marketed, and used in ways that affect many aspects of everyday life. The nature and extent of these effects, and their special meaning for women, are at the core of the The Push to Prescribe (Women’s Press, 2009). Editor Anne Rochon Ford and contributors Colleen Fuller and Abby Lippman presented key issues from the book and responded to questions from participants.

For more information on The Push to Prescribe, visit http://www.nnewh.org/article.php?itemID=49&section=1 

Watched the webinar? Please tell us what you thought!
Click here to complete the evaluation

Production of this webinar has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

Anti-depressants in pregnancy: Is there evidence of benefit?

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WATCH THE WEBINAR! (recorded Thursday Oct. 29, 2009)

Presenter: Dr. Barbara Mintzes, Assistant Professor, UBC Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, UBC Centre for Health Services & Policy Research, and Steering Committee member, Women and Health Protection

Antidepressants are increasingly being used to treat depression in pregnancy in Canada despite their lack of approval for this use by Health Canada or the US FDA. Recent scientific and public attention has focused on an increased risk for infants, and this has led to conflicting advice about the use of SSRI/SNRI antidepressants (such as Prozac, Paxil, Effexor, or other related drugs) during pregnancy. Some suggest avoiding all exposures, while others recommend use in order to avoid harm to mothers and infants from untreated depression.

Mintzes presents what she and colleagues found in a systematic evaluation of all available studies comparing women with depression who did or did not take antidepressants during pregnancy. Their goal was to find an answer to the controversial and urgent clinical question: do pregnant women benefit from taking antidepressants?

Watched the webinar? Please tell us what you thought!
Click here to complete the evaluation form

Production of this webinar has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

Now Available - Network Spring/Summer issue, Vol 11 No 2

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This issue of Network focuses on why and how gender matters in mental health in Canada—a high priority in our work at the Canadian Women’s Health Network and the Centres of Excellence for Women’s Health.

With the Mental Health Commission of Canada currently shining the spotlight on mental health issues across the country, we have the opportunity to further promote and advance sex- and gender-based analysis of mental health care in this country. In January 2009 the Commission released its first draft framework of a Canadian mental health strategy for public discussion: Toward Recovery and Well-Being: A Framework for a Mental Health Strategy in Canada. Unfortunately, the Commission’s newly released strategy does not yet include a sex- and gender-based analysis. See the full issue here!

Newly updated - Women, Mental Health and Mental Illness and Addiction in Canada: An Overview

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By the Ad Hoc Working Group on Women, Mental Health, Mental Illness and Addictions

Originally published by CWHN in May 2006 prior to the tabling of the Standing Senate Committee on Social Affairs, Science and Technology’s final report Out of the Shadows at Last: Transforming Mental Health, Mental Illness, and Addiction Services in Canada, this report by the Ad Hoc Working Group discusses why sex and gender matter in mental health and addictions and includes information and recommendations for the new Mental Health Commission of Canada. To date, the Commission has not addressed sex and gender in their work, highlighting the importance and relevance of the document to this day. Also, for the first time, this report is available in French, under the title, Les femmes, la santé mentale, les maladies mentales et la toxicomanie au Canada: tour d’horizon.

Read the report >>>



What we're reading...

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What People Need to Know about Psychiatric Drugs

By E. Daisy Anderson and Janet Currie

Psychiatric Medication Awareness Group (PMAG) (Revised 2009)

See review on pg 34 of Network >>>

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Girl Disrupted: Hormone Disrupters and Women's Reproductive Health

The Collaborative on Health and the Environment, California (January 2009)

Read report >>>

 

 

 

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