Search Resources (English): English, Socioeconomic determinants

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Breast cancer incidence and neighbourhood income  
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2011002/article/11426-eng.htm

Examines how, unlike several other diseases, breast cancer in developed countries is higher among women in higher income groups. They conclude that this association with income “may be partly related to differences in parity and screening mammography, but other factors remain to be identified.” 

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Published: 2011
The role of socio-economic status in diabetes in women  
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/daily-quotidien/100818/dq100818b-eng.htm

A study that found that low levels of household income and education are associated with the onset of type 2 diabetes in Canadian women, independent of other factors such as the well-established relationship with excess weight. For men, the association between type 2 diabetes and lower education attainment disappeared entirely when weight and behavioural factors were taken into account.

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Published: 2010
Social determinants of health: Canadian perspectives, second edition  
http://www.cspi.org/books/social_determinants_health

Discusses how the socio-economic conditions shape the health of individuals, communities, and jurisdictions, and how they establish the extent to which Canadians possess the resources to identify and achieve personal aspirations, satisfy needs, and cope with the environment.

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Published: 2008
12th Annual national report card on health care  
http://www.cma.ca/multimedia/CMA/Content_Images/Inside_cma/Media_Release/2012/reportcard/CMA-2012National-Report-Card_en.pdf

Results of the annual poll that measures public opinion with respect to the health of the Canadian health care system. Found that the growing disparity in income in Canada has also meant a growing disparity in Canadians' perceptions of their health. In this report, higher income respondents were 29 percentage points more likely to describe their health as excellent or very good in comparison to lower income respondents. In 2009, the gap between the two groups was 17 points.

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Published: August 2012