Search Resources (English): Sex trade workers, Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)

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Sexual violence and dislocation in women's acquisition of HIV in Manitoba  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol5no2EN.pdf

Examines the relationship between violence, engagement in risk behaviours, HIV exposure, and economic conditions.

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Published: 2006
Health and safety in the sex trade: moving toward a proposal for an academic/community partnered multi-site research project: di  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/nnewh/HealthSafetySexTrade.pdf

Summarizes the work of a group of Canadian researchers located in different parts of the country who came together to participate in the two-part workshop, Health and Safety in the Sex Trade: Moving toward a proposal for an academic-community partnered multi-site research project, funded by the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health.

 (See Details)
Published: 2002
Striking to the heart of the matter: selected readings on gender and HIV  
http://www.acewh.dal.ca/pdf/Striking_to_the_Heart_of_the_Matter.pdf

Discusses awareness of gender issues and differences with the disease, as well as challenges of understanding the experiences of those at greater risk of HIV.

 (See Details)
Published: 2002
Short report. Dispelling myths and understanding realities: working conditions, health status, and exiting experiences of sex w  
http://www.peers.bc.ca/images/DispMythsshort.pdf
Looks at the sex trade from a work perspective, arguing that there is an urgent need to give voice to sex workers located in indoor as well as outdoor venues. (See Details)
Published: 2001
Dispelling myths and understanding realities: working conditions, health status, and exiting experiences of sex workers  
http://web.uvic.ca/~cbenoit/papers/DispMyths.pdf
Details how most sex trade workers see the sex trade is their main means of making a living, and that those working on the street experience comparatively less occupational control and more harassment than counterparts located in indoor venues. Examines how the criminal nature of the sex trade in Canada has a dramatic impact on workers’ rights and safety. Explores how most sex trade worker report that their health is not what they would like it to be, that only a minority escape from their situations through the use of illicit addictive substances, and that even those who have permanently exited continue to struggle with mental health and related problems. Suggests the need for a variety of frontline and preventive health services. (See Details)
Published: 2001