Search Resources (English): Health policy, British Columbia Centre of Excellence for Women's Health (BCCEWH)

6 results

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Improving conditions: integrating sex and gender into federal mental health and addictions policy  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/ImprovingConditions.pdf

Examines factors across the lifespan that demonstrate why an examination of sex differences and gender influences is crucial to any policy work in mental health and substance use.

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Published: 2006
The mice that roared: using feminist activist principles to influence policy  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol2no1EN.pdf

Discusses how feminist activist principles can offer effective strategies for inclusive research practices, public advocay and policy change.

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Published: 2001
Caring for lesbian health: a resource for Canadian health care providers, policy makers and planners  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/bccewh/caring-lesbian-health.pdf

Considers the legacy of homophobia in health care, and its impact on health care access. Suggests ways for planners, policy makers and practitioners to increase accessibility and eliminate discrimination.

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Published: 2001
Gender inclusive health planning project: interim report
Provides an analysis of data collected, through key informant interviews, participant observation, and a documentary review.
Published: 1999
The discredited medical subject in health policy and practice: carrier First Nation women in Northern British Columbia  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/en/publications/RB/v4n1/page2.shtml
Examines First Nation women's encounters with health services providers. (See Details)
Published: 2003
Paradoxes and contradictions in health policy reform: implications for First Nations women  
http://www.bccewh.bc.ca/publications-resources/documents/Paradoxes_and_Contradictions.pdf

When governments invite the public to participate in consultations to reform health care and other policies, they generally represent themselves as calling upon citizens to engage in a social, but apolitical process. This study questions this representation by rethinking how policy is formulated and enacted and by rethinking how Aboriginal women are regarded when they engage in the health care system.

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Published: 2008