Search Resources (English): Access to care, Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)

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Profiles - violence in lesbian relationships a double invisibility : an interview with sally papsco  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1993_Healthsharing_Vol_14_No_1_Spring_Summer.pdf

This article is an interview with sally papsco about violence in lesbian relationships. Identifies appropriate resources and support. Discusses the unique challenges of addressing intimate partner violence in lesbian communities. 

 

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Published: 1993
Portraits of women in health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1986_Healthsharing_Vol_7_No_3_Summer.pdf

This article demonstrates in portraits how some immigrant women, women of colour and native women are working to eradicate the bias they face while accessing the health care system.  Examines how some immigrant women, women of colour and native women enrich the existing system by incorporating the wisdom of other cultures. 

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Published: 1986
Midwifery in transition  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1993_Healthsharing_Vol_14_No_2_Summer_Fall.pdf

This article discusses the regulation of midwifery and white privilege. Explores how white midwifery can work to create an  inclusive practice in order to provide appropriate care for a diversity of women. 

 


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Published: 1993
Visions for women’s reproductive care: interview with two health activists  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1988_Healthsharing_Vol_9_No_2_Spring.pdf

This article shares an interview with two health activists about development in the pro-choice struggle and the fight to legalize midwifery. Discuss the importance of shared visions and the complexities of balancing short and long-term strategies to achieve fundamental change. 


 

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Published: 1988
Not quite a refuge: refugee women in canada   
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1988_Healthsharing_Vol_9_No_3_Summer.pdf

This article speaks to experiences of refugee women in Canada. Barriers for refugee women seeking health care and social services. Describes inadequacies of services for refugee women and how they can be improved. 

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Published: 1988
Through women’s eyes: the case for a feminist epidemiology   
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1988_Healthsharing_Vol_10_No_1_Winter.pdf

This article calls for a woman-centered approach within medical research. Identifies why a feminist epidemiology is necessary. Defines feminist epidemiology. 

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Published: 1988
Long distance delivery  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1988_Healthsharing_Vol_10_No_1_Winter.pdf

This article speaks to the unfortunate effects of regionalization on women's health. Indicates how regionalization shapes the birth experiences of women in many areas of Canada. Introduces The Project on Out-of-Town Birth research project.  A survey of health professionals reviewed. 

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Published: 1988
No new law!  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1988_Healthsharing_Vol_10_No_1_Winter.pdf

This article outlines the spectrum of reactions to the supreme court decision on abortion. The author indicates abortion as a catalyst for raising other women's health issues. 

 


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Published: 1988
We are family  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1989_Healthsharing_Vol_10_No_4_Fall.pdf

This article shares the story of a lesbian couple denied coverage with OHIP. Discusses the importance of access to health care. Redefines "family". 

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Published: 1989
Labels, laws and access to health care: how history continues to affect health-care access for First Nations and Métis women  
http://www.cwhn.ca/node/39420

Describes the Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence report, Entitlements and Health Services for First Nations and Métis Women in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Discusses how access to health services differs among Aboriginal people and how understanding the history behind these differences and what they mean for women is critical to improving health services used by Aboriginal women.

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Published: Spring/Summer 2008