Search Resources (English): Physician patient relationships

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Getting through medical examinations: a resource for women survivors of abuse and their health care providers  
http://cwhn.ca/en/yourhealth/faqs/GettingThroughMedicalExaminations

Raises awareness and provides information to health care providers and survivors of abuse who use the health care system, using suggestions drawn from women survivors' and practitioners' recommendations and the experiences of other colleagues and professionals working in the area. Based on two research projects for the Prairie Women's Health Centre of Excellence. The first project looked at the experiences with women survivors of childhood sexual abuse and their recommendations for better meeting their health care needs. The second study explored the experience and knowledge of health care practitioners.

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Published: 2001
You and your doctor  
http://www.prhc.on.ca/WomensHealth/Site%20Map/You%20and%20Your%20Doctor.aspx

Provides information on patients' rights, as well as how to prepare for a doctor's appointment.

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Published: 2003
Lesbian health: a guide for teens  
http://www.youngwomenshealth.org/lesbianhealth.html

Presents a guide for teens on lesbian health. Explains what a lesbian is, how you can tell if you are a lesbian, what it means to bisexual, where you can go to get more information, what you should tell your parents, where they can get information and other resources.

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Published: 1999-2004
Creating a safe clinical environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) patients  
http://www.glma.org/medical/clinical/lgbti_clinical_guidelines.pdf

Provides health care providers with ways to make their practice or clinic more welcoming and safe for their lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex patients. Includes ideas to update the physical environment in their clinic, add or change intake and health history form questions, improve provider-patient interviews, and increase staff's knowledge about and sensitivity to their LGBTI patients.

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Published: 2003
The role of the Internet in patient-practitioner relationships: findings from a qualitative research study  
http://www.jmir.org/2004/3/e36/
Explores patients’ and practitioners’ use of the Internet and considers whether use of the Internet is changing relationships between patients and health-care practitioners. (See Details)
Published: 2004
Building bridges across difference and disability: a resource guide for health care providers: interacting with people with faci
Presents suggestions for health professionals to enhance their knowledge and skills in interactions with clients with physical differences and/or disabilities.
Published: 2002
Unequal treatment: confronting racial and ethnic disparities in health care  
http://books.nap.edu/catalog/10260.html
Explores how persons of colour experience the health care environment. Examines how disparities in treatment may arise in health care systems and looks at aspects of the clinical encounter that may contribute to such disparities. Highlights the potential of cross-cultural education to improve provider-patient communication and offers a detailed look at how to integrate cross-cultural learning within the health professions. (See Details)
Published: 2003
Make the most of your doctor  
http://bmj.com/cgi/content/full/326/7402/1292
Presents steps to make the most of your doctor's appointment. (See Details)
Published: 2003
The homeopathic conversation: the art of taking the case
Looks at practitioner-patient relationship for homeopaths and homeopathic students.
Published: 2001
I am a good patient, believe it or not  
http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/cgi/content/full/326/7402/1293
Discusses what patients really want from their health care providers, including answers to questions in easy-to-understand terms, how they will participate in their health care, seeing and sharing their health records, the right to a second opinion with no negative effects on their ongoing care, and being able to communicate with their providers outside of consultations. (See Details)
Published: 2003