Search Resources (English): Contraceptive research and development

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Selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use

Provides guidance for how to safely and effectively use contraceptive methods once they have been deemed medically appropriate. Provides selected evidence-based practice recommendations for use by policy makers, program managers, the scientific community, and national family planning or reproductive health programs. Recommendations are organized into 23 questions.

Published: 2002
Contraception online  
http://www.contraceptiononline.org
Online resource contains contraception resources for clinicians, researchers and educators. Website includes slide library, patient information, online meetings, and electronic contraception updates. (See Details)
Published: 2004
Bill of rights for contraceptive research, development and use
Offers a list of ethical principles, specific guidelines for research, development, testing, evaluation and monitoring. Provides direction to funders and policy makers for planning reproductive health research programs.
Published: 1997
The quinacrine debate and beyond: exploring the challenges of reproductive health technology development and introduction  
http://www.genderhealth.org/pubs/quinacrine.pdf
Discusses and assesses the past, present and future of quinacrine sterilization as a method of female sterilization. Explores the ethical dimensions of contraceptive research and development.  (See Details)
Published: 2002
Network: new contraceptive users  
http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_4/index.htm
Examines how first-time contraceptive users are a diverse group that includes young adults who have recently become sexually active and older couples who initiate use after the births of their children. (See Details)
Published: 1999
Network: community-based distribution  
http://www.fhi.org/en/RH/Pubs/Network/v19_3/index.htm
Examines how community-based distribution programs take contraceptive methods to people where they live, rather than requiring people to visit clinics or other locations for services. (See Details)
Published: 1999
Copper containing intra-uterine devices versus depot progestogens for contraception  
http://www.mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/clsysrev/articles/CD007043/frame.html

Reversible, longterm contraception is relied on by millions of women to prevent unwanted pregnancy. Two very common methods of pregnancy prevention are the use of a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) or an injection of a progestogen hormone.  We reviewed studies that compared these two highly effective methods and found the IUD to be better at preventing pregnancy  than depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). Relevant to HIV positive women are the results of one small trial that found that women using the IUD for contraception where less likely to experience a worsening of their HIV disease than those using hormonal contraception. A large, high quality study is urgently needed to shed light on these findings.

 (See Details)
Published: 2010
Contraception methods for HIV-positive women and women at risk for HIV  
http://www2.catie.ca/en/resource/contraception-methods-hiv-positive-women-and-women-risk-hiv

A factsheet on contraception and HIV positive women stating that women should be offered a wide range of contraceptive methods in order to make informed choices regarding reproduction. Twenty-five percent of Women Living with HIV/AIDS (WHA) worldwide have an unmet need for contraception.

 (See Details)
Published: 2010
In great demand : the revival of the cervical cap  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1982_Healthsharing_Fall.pdf

This article explains the cervical cap, its benefits and challenges and explores why it is regaining popularity. 

 (See Details)
Published: 1982
The case against depo provera  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1982_Healthsharing_Fall.pdf

This article discusses depo provera. Highlights the controversy of discriminatory and unsafe research methods, discusses the drug industry, potential health effects on women, racist practices. 

 (See Details)
Published: 1982