Search Resources (English): Centres of Excellence for Women's Health - Consortium Université de Montréal (CESAF)

Results 1 - 10 of 15

Results

Experiences of immigrant and refugee women in Quebec with the health care system  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/ bulletin-vol1no1EN.pdf

Examines the health experiences of immigrant and refugee women and looks at whether they are receiving adequate and appropriate care from the Canadian health care system.

 (See Details)
Published: 2000
Caregivers and support services: becoming empowered  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol1no2EN.pdf

Examine the support needs of caregivers, their expectations regarding support services, the adequacy of existing services, and which services, interventions or practitioners faciliate caregiver empowerment.

 (See Details)
Published: 2001
Immigration and perinatal risk  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol2no2EN.pdf

Investigates factors associated with the immigrant experience that may increase vulnerability to health risks during the perinatal period of pregnancy.

 (See Details)
Published: 2001
Promoting women's health through public consultation  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol2no3EN.pdf

Discusses how to take research and community findings into public consultations to change policy at the local community health level.

 (See Details)
Published: 2001
Towards gender-sensitive health indicators  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/CEWH/RB/bulletin-vol2no3EN.pdf

Describes the features of a system of gender-sensitive indicators that would more adequately measure women's health. Offers criteria for the selection of these indicators.

 (See Details)
Published: 2002
The health of Cree, Inuit and Southern Quebec women: similarities and differences

Using the data from a number of the surveys conducted over the last 10 years by Sante Quebec, this study examines the health characteristics of two populations of Aboriginal women of northern Quebec compared to those of women in the rest of the province. The northern populations had a larger proportion of young women. Aboriginal women have heavier family responsibilities than other Quebec women. Inuit women had a much higher prevalence of smoking and drug use. Alcohol consumption was less frequent in northern women, but the quantity consumed was higher compared to other Quebec women. Cree women tended to be more obese, had higher levels of blood glucose and lower levels of cholesterol. Inuit women tended to have lower rates of hypertension and higher rates of declared hearing problems and mental disorders. The similarities and differences observed among these three populations of women can assist decision-makers in setting priorities with regards to maintaining and improving their health.

Published: 2000
The price of health care reform for women: the case of Quebec  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/health_reform/quebec-reformEN.pdf

Examines the scope and nature of privatization trends in the health care system in Quebec and its consequences for women.

 (See Details)
Published: 2000
Life long ties

Presents a documentary that profiles three women and a man who have taken on the responsibility of caring for a family member. Includes a round table discussion between caregivers and chrinic care professionals. The video is accomapnied by a booklet with introduces the participants in the video as well as highlighting themes and posing key questions for the viewer.

Published: 1998
Aboriginal women and maternity: fetal alcohol syndrome  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/cesaf/fetal-alcohol.pdf

Examines substance use during pregnancy by Aboriginal women in Quebec, focusing on the prevention of FAS and FAE.

 (See Details)
Published: 1998
An inventory of conceptual frameworks and women's health indicators  
http://www.cewh-cesf.ca/PDF/cesaf/conceptual-frameworks.pdf

Provides an inventory of health and social indicators in Canadian and international literature as they relate to women’s health. Discusses conceptual frameworks and health determinants and their impact on women’s health.

 (See Details)
Published: 2001