Search Resources (English): Occupational health

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Double exposure the fight against reproductive hazards in the workplace   
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1980_Healthsharing_Vol_1_No_4_Fall.pdf

This article discusses exclusionary practices by industries; how often women have been excluded from jobs traditionally worked by men that may involve occupational hazards to reproduction; Discusses risks for men; Calls for improvement of work environment rather than discrimination of workers; Includes excerpt from “Workplace Hazards to Reproduction” Jennifer Penney, Health November 1978.

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Published: 1980
If the chair fits, sit on it  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1981_Healthsharing_Vol_2_No_4_Fall.pdf

This article discusses workplace furniture and our bodies. Provides a checklist to determine whether the chair you sit on at work is good for your well being. Recommends what to do about it.

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Published: 1981
Very damning testimony  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1982_Healthsharing_Spring.pdf

This article discusses the influx of Video Display Terminals in workplaces. Explains VDTs and how they are harmful for clerical workers. Introduces strategies for change. 

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Published: 1982
The politics of artificial light  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1982_Healthsharing_Spring.pdf

 This article addresses our increased dependency on artificial light, specifically fluorescent light. Describes how this increased dependency came to be. identifies how this change in our environment has impacted our bodies and biological rhythms. Explains how artificial light differs from the sun. 

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Published: 1982
Mercury poisoning: one woman’s story  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1983_Healthsharing_Summer.pdf

This article consists of an interview with a dental assistant who learns too late about the occupational hazards of mercury. Her story describes a struggle with illness, with the dental and medical professions, with the compensation system, with family and friends and with herself. 


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Published: 1983
Pharmaceuticals manufacturing: what do we know about the occupational health and safety hazards for women working in the industry?   
http://www.whp-apsf.ca/pdf/Pharmaceutical%20Manufacturing-%20Health%20%20Safety%20_2_.pdf

Describes how pharmaceuticals are developed and produced, and what is known about the associated hazards. Includes an overview of health and safety laws in Canada and elsewhere, as well as some examples of relevant best practices. Concludes with a series of recommendations. Abridged version of “Occupational health and safety hazards in pharmaceuticals manufacturing: Past, present and future knowledge, policies and possibilities, particularly for women,” written by Dorothy Wigmore for Women and Health Protection.

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Published: March 2009
Taking action  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1985_Healthsharing_Vol_6_No_3_Summer.pdf

Interview with Saskia Post, a mother who gave birth to a child with multiple deformities due to the chemical environment she was exposed to while working at English Plastics in Brampton Ontario. Saskia launched a law suit against her former employer. 

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Published: 1985
Findings from the 2005 National survey of the work and health of nurses (NSWHN)  
http://www.cihi.ca/CIHI-ext-portal/pdf/internet/NURSING_NSWHN_SUMMARY2005_EN

The survey was administered to a sample of LPNs, RNs and RPNs from across the country. Data from the survey help to identify relationships between selected health outcomes, the work environment and work-life experiences.

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Published: 2005
Beyond male bias in occupational health  
http://www.cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/PDF/Healthsharing/1985_Healthsharing_Vol_6_No_3_Summer.pdf

In this article, Debbie Field speaks with Stan Gray of the Hamilton Workers’ Occupational Health and Safety Centre. Discusses how the centre responds to reproductive workplace hazards. 

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Published: 1985
Neurotoxic exposures and effects: gender and sex matter!  
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuro.2012.05.009

Discusses how environmental and occupational neurotoxicology research continues to confuse the terms sex (biological attributes) and gender (socially constructed roles and behavior) and to use these words interchangeably. Notes studies that examine both males and females, providing evidence for sex differences in toxicokinetics and responses to neurotoxic assault as well as gender differences in exposure patterns, biomarkers of exposure, neurobehavioral performance and social consequences. Argues that integrating sex and gender considerations into research in neurotoxicology would not only provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms and pathways that lead to toxic assault, but also provide a means to improve preventive intervention strategies.

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Published: 2012