Search Resources (English): Breast cancer and the environment

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Breasts: A natural and unnatural history  
http://www.florencewilliams.com/

Written by science journalist Florence Williams who discusses the latest science from the fields of anthropology, biology, and medicine as it relates to breast health. Investigates the life cycle of the breast from puberty to pregnancy to menopause. Examines examines how our breasts and our environment are intricately related because breasts are made up of fat and glandular tissue and more easily absorb chemical toxins from the environment than do many other parts of our body. 

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Published: 2012
State of the evidence 2010: the connection between breast cancer and the environment  
http://www.breastcancerfund.org/media/publications/state-of-the-evidence/

This edition of the Breast Cancer Fund's landmark report summarizes and evaluates the scientific evidence linking exposures to chemicals and radiation in our everyday environments to increased breast cancer risk. It also links the science to actions we can take to reduce the risk.

Includes a new advocacy section, From Science to Action, by Janet Nudelman M.A. and Connie Engel, Ph.D.

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Published: 2010
Chemical exposures of women workers in the plastics industry with particular reference to breast cancer and reproductive hazards  
http://www.nnewh.org/images/upload/attach/5316New%20Solutions%20Article.pdf

Explores the occupational exposures in producing plastics and health risks to workers, particularly women, who make up a large part of the workforce. Demonstrates that workers are exposed to chemicals that have been identified as mammary carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals, and that the work environment is heavily contaminated with dust and fumes. Finds that, as a consequence, plastics workers have a body burden of environmental contaminants that far exceeds that found in the general public.

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Published: 2012
Rethinking breast cancer and the environment: the case for the precautionary principle  
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1533169/

Provides a framework for examining and determining the environmental causes of breast cancer. 

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Published: September 1998
The Cancer-Smart Guide to Breast Cancer Prevention  
http://www.toxicfreecanada.ca/articlefull.asp?uid=136

A free 24-page downloadable guide to peer-reviewed research on breast cancer prevention.

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Published: 2011
Pathways to breast cancer: a case study for innovation in chemical safety evaluation  
http://coeh.berkeley.edu/greenchemistry/cbcrpdocs/executive_summary.pdf

A report of the Breast Cancer and Chemicals Policy Project, arising because proposed legislation in the US calls for disclosure of information about the toxicity of industrial chemicals. Investigates how such efforts could help identify chemicals that may raise the risk of breast cancer. Includes a testing scheme, called the Hazard Identification Approach, that provides a methodology for identifying substances that could elevate breast cancer risk.

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Published: 2010
Plastics industry workers and breast cancer risk: Q & A  
http://cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/resources/cancer/plastics%20%26%20BC%20risk%20Q%20%26%20A%20ENG.pdf

A question and answer format factsheet on the health issues facing women who work in industries, such as the automotive industry, in which they work with plastics. Discusses the risk of developing breast cancer due to these exposures, the current situation with occupational health standards, and what should be done to change those standards.

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Published: 2012
Not a flower shop: exploring breast cancer risk and gender bias ... in the automotive plastic parts industry in Ontario  
http://cwhn.ca/en/networkmagazine/notaflowershop

Discusses the work of researchers Jim Brophy and Margaret Keith who have studied the links between cancer risk and occupation in the automovie plastics industry in Sarnia, Ontario. Much of the material used in this article is drawn from the chapter entitled “Plastics Industry Workers and Breast Cancer Risk: Are We Heeding the Warnings?” in the book Consuming Chemicals: Law, Science and Policy for Women's Health, edited by D.N. Scott and written by Brophy, Keith, and fellow researchers Robert DeMatteo, Michael Gilbertson, Andrew Watterson and Matthias Beck. 

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Published: 2012
Defining endocrine disruptors: are women workers in the automotive plastics industry particularly at risk?  
http://cwhn.ca/sites/default/files/resources/cancer/defining%20endocrine%20disruptors%20-%20EN%20Final.pdf

A clear language factsheet describing the possible health dangers from chemical expsurres experienced by women who work in the automotive plastics industry.  Exposures described are mainly by breathing the fumes and dusts, and also by absorption through the skin. Many of these chemicals interfere with hormone systems and are therefore called endocrine disruptors.

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Published: 2012
NNEWH Plastics workshop (video series)  
http://www.youtube.com/user/nnewh/videos

Fourteen videos documenting a workshop hosted by NNEWH in partnership with the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) in January 2012 in Windsor, Ontario. The workshop dealt with recent studies on the emerging health concerns for women workers in the auto sector, specifically plastics manufacturing and the possible elevated incidence of breast cancer and reproductive problems in women plastics workers. 

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Published: 2012