Search Resources (English): Overweight

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Body Weight  
http://www.womenshealthdata.ca/category.aspx?catid=81&rt=2

Summarizes how overweight and obesity affect women by looking at sex, gender and diversity. Also critiques the BMI as an accurate measure of overweight and obesity.

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Overweight and obesity in women: health risks and consequences  
http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/452831

Examines in detail the effects of obesity on women’s health.
You will need to register with Medscape to read this, but it is free.

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Published: 2003
Endocrine disruption  
http://www.womenshealthdata.ca/category.aspx?catid=169&rt=2

Discusses how women, who are still the primary caregivers, are more exposed to common endocrine disrupting chemicals such as household cleaning products, than are men, and this exposes them to health risks.

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Diabetes-obesity spectrum  
http://www.healthandenvironment.org/initiatives/diabetes

Examines obesity’s relationship to diabetes, and possible relationships being explored between synthetic chemicals and diabetes, obesity, insulin resistance, or metabolic syndrome.

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There is a public health crisis – it’s not fat on the body but fat in the mind and the fat of profits   
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/1/67.full

The author of Fat is a Feminist Issue argues that the way obesity is being framed as a crisis or an epidemic is stigmatizing overweight people and adding dangerously to disordered eating, which is itself a serious public health emergency.

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Published: February 2006
The epidemiology of overweight and obesity: public health crisis or moral panic?  
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/1/55.full

Argues that scientific evidence does not support claims about "the obesity epidemic" and does not justify diverting scarce resources away from more pressing public health issues. Evaluates four central claims made by those who are calling for intensifying the "war on fat": that obesity is an epidemic; that overweight and obesity are major contributors to mortality; that higher than average adiposity is pathological and a primary direct cause of disease; and that significant long-term weight loss is both medically beneficial and a practical goal. 

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Published: February 2006