Search Resources (English): Depression screening

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Overweight and obesity in Canada: a population health perspective  
http://secure.cihi.ca/cihiweb/products/CPHIOverweightandObesityAugust2004_e.pdf

Synthesizes the current state of knowledge related to: 1) the nature and extent of the problem of obesity, 2) the impact of obesity as a case for prevention and control, 3) a population health perspective on the determinants of obesity, and 4) effectiveness of strategies for addressing obesity and its determinants. Identifies priorities for future policy-relevant research and presents the author's options for promising interventions for reducing population obesity levels.

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Published: 2004
A systematic review of studies validating the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale in antepartum and postpartum women  
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0447.2009.01363.x/full

Examines the the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) which is widely used to screen women for postpartum depression, and concludes that it may not be an equally valid screening tool across all settings and contexts.

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Published: May 2009
Postnatal depression and screening: too broad a sweep?  
http://europepmc.org/articles/PMC1314671/pdf/14601333.pdf

A critique of the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale, the primary test used to screen women for postnatal depression. Finds that there is a high risk of misdiagnosing women with this test - and the false positives (30-70%) could lead to unnecessary and inappropriate treatment.

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Published: 2003
Postpartum depression: literature review of risk factors and interventions  
http://www.who.int/mental_health/prevention/suicide/lit_review_postpartum_depression.pdf

Argues that problems with existing screening tools for postpartum depression make it difficult to recommend them for routine screening. Concludes that depression screening “must be combined with systemic paths for referral of cases and well defined and implemented care plans to achieve outcome benefits.”

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Published: 2003
Obesity in Canada  
http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/hp-ps/hl-mvs/oic-oac/index-eng.php

Finds some significant differences between women and men when looking at obesity, showing, for example, that income is more strongly related to obesity for women than for men. Also finds that income, rural residence and minority status (mainly Aboriginal) are related to obesity in women and men even when controlling for health (or lifestyle) behaviours, such as inactivity, fruit and vegetable consumption and alcohol use. Their analysis of obesity is limited, as the authors note, by fact that data on “access to healthy foods and food outlets, consumption of traditional diets, caloric density, marketing of foods and beverages high in sugar and fat to children, and portion sizes have not been considered in the analysis.” The report was also limited by other factors, such as the fact that those not reporting body mass index (BMI) measurement (e.g. pregnant women) were excluded

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Published: 2011
Obesity, overweight, and ethnicity  
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2004004/article/8041-eng.pdf

Examines the differences in obesity and overweight between men and women by ethnic origin. Finds that Aboriginal women had twice the odds of being overweight or obese as white women, while East/Southeast Asian, South Asian and West Asian/Arab women had lower odds. 

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Published: 2005
Preventing obesity in women of all ages: a public health priority  
http://www.idf.org/sites/default/files/attachments/2009_SI%20Women_Lombard_Teede.pdf

Discusses how no risk factor or disease association is stronger than the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, and that women are far more likely than men to develop type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or obese.

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Published: May 2009
Incident arthritis in relation to excess weight  
http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-003-x/2003001/article/6764-eng.pdf

Finds that women have a much higher likelihood of suffering from arthritis than men, and that, for both women and men, obesity is a risk factor for arthritis.

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Published: 2004
Global database on body mass index  
http://apps.who.int/bmi/index.jsp

The global epidemic of overweight and obesity - "globesity" - is rapidly becoming a major public health problem in many parts of the world. Paradoxically coexisting with undernutrition in developing countries, the increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity is associated with many diet-related chronic diseases including diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension and certain cancers.

This database provides both national and sub-national adult underweight, overweight and obesity prevalence rates by country, year of survey and gender. The information is presented interactively as maps, tables, graphs and downloadable documents. These can be accessed by clicking on the respective tabs above; then the data can be displayed after selecting the country, year and indicator 

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There is a public health crisis—it’s not fat on the body but fat in the mind and the fat of profits   
http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/35/1/67.full

The author of Fat is a Feminist Issue argues that the way obesity is being framed as a “crisis” or “epidemic” is stigmatizing overweight people and adding dangerously to disordered eating, which itself is a serious public health emergency. 

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Published: 2005