Women, Plastics and Breast Cancer

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Congratulations Jim Brophy and Margaret Keith

James T. Brophy and Margaret M. Keith

Brophy and Keith are lead authors of Breast cancer risk in relation to occupations with exposure to carcinogens and endocrine disruptors: a Canadian case–control study, a journal article published in Environmental Health (November 2012). The article which describes their research into occupational exposures and breast cancer was co-winner of the American Public Health Association (APHA) Scientific Award in the Occupational Health category.

Read the full article here and view the media release about the Scientific Award from APHA.

From the Environmental Health press release:

"The award recognizes the work of international research teams that recently completed two complementary studies on breast cancer and occupational exposures. The Scientific Award Lecture took place at the 141st APHA Annual Meeting on Tuesday 5th November in Boston, where Dr James Brophy gave a lecture entitled 'Breast cancer and work: why research and preventive action are needed'."


The CWHN strongly supports and promotes the important work being done in the area of breast cancer prevention, such as this event event in Toronto, Ontario co-sponsored by the National Network on Environments and Women's Health & The Canadian Women's Health Network:

Recently we promoted new findings on chemical exposures of women workers in the plastics industry. See news release below. This new study spearheaded by Robert DeMatteo, in partnership with Margaret Keith, James Brophy, and the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health(NNEWH), presents strong evidence that women working in the plastics industry are exposed to workplace chemicals that can increase their risk of breast cancer and reproductive abnormalities.

We are proud to have been part of the recent community panel on breast cancer and workplace risk (Windsor, ON, November 19, 2012). You can read the press release below.  We applaud the contributions of the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation in this ground-breaking research. Read a summary of the research findings or the full study.

Watch our webinar on breast cancer rates in plastics plants

The CWHN also has a webinar on this topic, featuring Sari Sairanen from the Canadian Auto Workers; James Brophy and Margaret Keith, principal researchers on the "Women, Plastics and Breast Cancer Project"; and Gina Desantis, an auto worker from Windsor, Ontario.

CWHN Executive Director, Anne Rochon Ford, moderates this compelling discussion. View the WebinarAnd read a recent review of it in CAND Vital Link, the magazine of the Canadian Association of Naturopathic Doctors.

Also, read the feature article in Network magazine Not a Flower Shop: Exploring breast cancer risk and gender bias in the automotive plastic parts industry in Ontario based on interviews with James Brophy and Margaret Keith.

Get the Word Out on breast cancer prevention

The CWHN supports and promotes the work of cancer prevention through our programs such as "Get the Word Out", our breast cancer prevention awareness postcard project. Order your postcards today.

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Prevent the Root Causes

Get the Word Out Postcards are supported by your donations. If you would like to help, please make a secure online donation now and we will be able to send more postcard kits to groups in your community.

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    New Research: Chemical Exposures of Women Workers in the Plastics Industry in Relation to Breast Cancer Risk

    National Network on Environments and Women's Health

    PRESS RELEASE

    TORONTO, ON (December 6, 2012) A new study published in the journal New Solutions presents strong evidence that women employed in the plastics industry are exposed to workplace chemicals that can increase their risk of breast cancer and reproductive abnormalities.  Spearheaded by Robert DeMatteo, in partnership with Margaret Keith, James Brophy, and the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health (NNEWH), the research supports Brophy and Keith’s recently reported epidemiological findings of a 5-fold elevated breast cancer risk for premenopausal women who work in the plastics industry.  Together, these studies reveal the need for swift regulatory action on carcinogenic and endocrine disrupting chemicals in Canada.  ...more

    Research findings: Chemical exposures contributing to elevated breast cancer risk in some occupations

    National Network on Environments and Women's Health

    PRESS RELEASE

    TORONTO, ON (November 19, 2012) A new Canadian study conducted by co-principal investigators James Brophy and Margaret Keith and an international, multidisciplinary team of co-investigators demonstrates that women working in particular occupations have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. The National Network on Environments and Women's Health (NNEWH) partnered with Brophy and Keith in the study's exposure assessment of automotive plastics workers in the Windsor, Ontario region. The research results are a valuable addition to growing evidence linking breast cancer and other diseases with exposure to toxic chemicals, and in particular, toxins in the workplace.  ...more



    PINK RIBBONS INC.

    A film screening and discussion about breast cancer fundraising and
    environmental links to cancer

    WHEN? Wednesday February 27 2013, 2PM - 4:30PM
    WHERE? Room 1009, TEL Building, York University, Toronto, ON

     

     

AttachmentSize
NNEWH Summary Research Findings ENGLISH.pdf116.72 KB
Case Control Study - Final Manuscript Nov 12, 2012.pdf1.05 MB
New Solutions Article.pdf118.38 KB
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