Environmental medicine

Environmental medicine

Film review - Programmed to be Fat

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Recension de film - Programmed to be Fat
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Alex Merrill
Edition: 
Network Magazine, 2012
Publisher: 
Canadian Women's Health Network
Publication Date: 
August 2012
Publication Place: 
Winnipeg, MB

Review of the film Programmed to be Fat, directed by Bruce Mohun, written by Bruce Mohun and Helen Slinger, and produced by Sue Ridout, Helen Slinger and Sara Darling for Dreamfilm Productions in association with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.This documentary examines emerging evidence that chemicals in our environment infiltrate pregnant women’s bodies and “program” their babies to be fat or obese as adults. The film aired on CBC Television’s The Nature of Things on January 12, 2012.

Order Information: 
Available online only.

Incorporating environmental health in clinical medicine

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Paper
Author: 
Stephen J. Genuis (Guest Editor)
Margaret Sears (Guest Editor)
Gerry Schwalfenberg (Guest Editor)
Janette Hope (Guest Editor)
Robin Bernhoft (Guest Editor)
Publisher: 
Hindawi Publishing Corporation
Publication Date: 
2012

A special issue of the Journal of Environmental and Public Health focussed on incorporating environmental health into medical practice.

Notes: 
Articles: Quick Environmental Exposure and Sensitivity Inventory in a Danish Population; Solar Radiation and Vitamin D:Mitigating Environmental Factors in Autoimmune Disease; Arsenic, Cadmium, Lead, and Mercury in Sweat: A Systematic Review; Efficacy of Sublingual Immunotherapy versus Subcutaneous Injection Immunotherapy in Allergic Patients; Human Impairment fromLiving near Confined Animal (Hog) Feeding Operations; Changes in Peak Flow Value during Immunotherapy Administration; Environmental Determinants of Chronic Disease and Medical Approaches: Recognition, Avoidance; Supportive Therapy, and Detoxification; A Safe Protocol for Amalgam Removal; Combination of Micronutrients for Bone (COMB) Study: Bone Density after Micronutrient Intervention; Earthing: Health Implications of Reconnecting the Human Body to the Earth’s Surface Electrons; A Review of the Diagnosis and Treatment of Ochratoxin A Inhalational Exposure Associated with Human Illness and Kidney Disease including Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis; Human Excretion of Bisphenol A: Blood, Urine, and Sweat (BUS) Study; Mercury Toxicity and Treatment: A Review of the Literature; Psychophysical Evaluation of Achromatic and Chromatic Vision ofWorkers Chronically Exposed to Organic Solvents; A Water-Damaged Home and Health of Occupants: A Case Study; Objective Assessment of an Ionic Footbath (IonCleanse): Testing Its Ability to Remove Potentially Toxic Elements from the Body; What’s Out There aking Us Sick; and The Alkaline Diet: Is There Evidence That an Alkaline pH Diet Benefits Health.

Neurotoxic exposures and effects: gender and sex matter!

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Paper
Author: 
Donna Mergler
Edition: 
Volume 33, Issue 4, August 2012, Pages 644–651
Publisher: 
NeuroToxicology (Elsevier)
Publication Date: 
2012

Discusses how environmental and occupational neurotoxicology research continues to confuse the terms sex (biological attributes) and gender (socially constructed roles and behavior) and to use these words interchangeably. Notes studies that examine both males and females, providing evidence for sex differences in toxicokinetics and responses to neurotoxic assault as well as gender differences in exposure patterns, biomarkers of exposure, neurobehavioral performance and social consequences. Argues that integrating sex and gender considerations into research in neurotoxicology would not only provide us with a better understanding of the mechanisms and pathways that lead to toxic assault, but also provide a means to improve preventive intervention strategies.

Environmental Health Perspectives

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Organization Type: 
Governmental Body
Service Language: 
English
Services Provided: 
Research
Publisher

A monthly journal of peer-reviewed research and news published by the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services. EHP's mission is to serve as a forum for the discussion of the interrelationships between the environment and human health by publishing in a balanced and objective manner the best peer-reviewed research and most current and credible news of the field. With an impact factor of 6.09, EHP is the top monthly journal in public, environmental, and occupational health and the third-ranked monthly journal in environmental sciences.

EHP publishes articles from a wide range of scientific disciplines encompassing basic research; epidemiologic studies; risk assessment; relevant ethical, legal, social, environmental justice, and policy topics; longitudinal human studies; in vitro and in vivo animal research with a clear relationship to human health; and environmental medicine case reports. Because children are uniquely sensitive to their environments, EHP devotes a research section specifically to issues surrounding children's environmental health.

Email Address: 
http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/feedbackCreate.action?page=%252Fstatic%252Fcontact.action
Country: 
USA

Webinar on biomonitoring: measuring the pollution in women’s bodies to build healthier communities

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
CWHN and the National Networks on Environments and Women’s Health
Publication Date: 
2011

Presenter Sharyle Patton explores the uses of biomonitoring – the testing of one’s body for chemical exposure – and looks at how the experience of knowing one's body burden (the total amount of chemicals present in the human body at any given time) can help inform personal choice and political engagement. While the findings from biomonitoring may be devastating to some on an individual level, Patton suggests that if the information is used with sensitivity and respect for tradition, it can be quite powerful in helping groups work for change in toxic chemical policy. A storyteller, Patton illustrates her message with the experiences of women she has encountered through her work.

Order Information: 
Available online only.

Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Organization Type: 
NGO - Non Government Organization
Service Language: 
English
Services Provided: 
Community education/development
Advocacy

Forms a membership organization for health professionals that works to protect the environment in order to protect human health. Educates physicians on environmental issues, providing them with both accurate information and a framework for thinking about environmental problems. Prepares spokespersons to comment on the health implications of environmental issues in an accurate and rigorous manner. Serves as a "think tank" for considering the health implications of environmental issues. Provides a forum in which physicians can meet and discuss health issues associated with environmental problems together with non-physician colleagues who have the knowledge and insight they need.

Primary Telephone: 
416-306-2273
Website/URL: 
Email Address: 
info@cape.ca
Fax Number: 
416-960-9392
Street Address: 
301-130 Spadina Ave
City: 
Toronto
Province: 
Ontario
Postal/ZIP Code: 
M5V 2L4
Syndicate content