Environmental hazards

Environmental hazards

Collaborative on Health and the Environment toxicant and disease database

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online

A searchable database that lists over 200 diseases and conditions associated with exposures to toxic chemicals, including endocrine disruptors. The data are categorized by strength of scientific evidence (strong, good or limited). The database is updated as new data are published in scientific literature reviews. The database does not include information about the route, timing, duration, or amount of exposure, but refers researchers to research sources for this information. 

Notes: 
Supplementary information relating to the chemicals identified is available through the Portal to Science on the CHE website: http://www.healthandenvironment.org/cgi-bin/portal.cgi

Cumulative impacts project

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English
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
Science and Environmental Health Network (SEHN) and the Collaborative on Health and the Enivronment (CHE)

Collects the latest science, emerging best practices, analytical tools, and legal shifts that can reduce cumulative harm from environmental factors to our planet, our communities, and ourselves. These three scopes represent different aspects of the problem of cumulative impacts and leverage points for addressing it. They also overlap and affect each other. Together they call for new precautionary decision structures and initiatives aimed at reducing total environmental impacts.

TEDX (The Endocrine Disruption Exchange, Inc.)

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Organization Type: 
NGO - Non Government Organization
Service Language: 
English
Services Provided: 
Research
Advocacy

An prevention-driven organization that focuses primarily on the human health and environmental problems caused by low-dose and/or ambient exposure to chemicals that interfere with development and function, called endocrine disruptors.  Its large databases on this topic are available for those concerned about public health and environmental quality. 

Contact Info
Primary Telephone: 
(970) 527-4082
Email Address: 
http://www.endocrinedisruption.com/contact.php
Fax Number: 
(970) 527-4082
Street Address: 
P.O. Box 1407
City: 
Paonia
Province: 
CO
Country: 
USA

Nuclear Information and Resource Service

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Organization Type: 
NGO - Non Government Organization
Service Language: 
English
Services Provided: 
Research
Advocacy

Founded in 1978 to be the US national information and networking center for citizens and environmental activists concerned about nuclear power, radioactive waste, radiation and sustainable energy issues. Has expanded both programatically and geographically to initiate large-scale organizing and public education campaigns on specific issues, such as preventing construction of new reactors, radioactive waste transportation, deregulation of radioactive materials, and more. With international programs and affiliation with WISE (World Information Service on Energy) the network spans more than a dozen offices and programs across the globe. 

Contact Info
Primary Telephone: 
301-270-NIRS (301-270-6477)
Email Address: 
nirsnet@nirs.org
Website/URL: 
Fax Number: 
301-270-4291
Street Address: 
6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 340
City: 
Takoma Park
Province: 
MD
Postal/ZIP Code: 
20912
Country: 
USA

Atomic radiation is more harmful to women

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English
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Mary Olson
Publisher: 
The Nuclear Information & Resource Service
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Takoma Park, MD, USA

Research paper showing that exposure to radiation causes 50% greater incidence of cancer and 50% greater rate of death from cancer among women, compared to the same radiation dose level to men. Discusses how, despite these differences in the ways women and men react to radiation, the world's radiation standards are determined using a "reference man" as the guide for assessing radiation risk. The paper is based on underreported information contained in the National Academy of Sciences 2006 BEIR-VII report, which also concluded that there is no "safe" level of radiation exposure.

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Visit their website to download.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Programmed to be Fat?

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Film
Publisher: 
Dreamfilm
Publication Date: 
2012

A documentary that tackles the possible role of synthetic chemicals in the 'obesity epidemic'. Tells the stories of three scientists whose unexpected findings led them to follow the research of a curious doctor in Scotland, baffled by her inability to lose weight. For three years she pored over existing research on environmental chemicals and finally published a key study in an alternative medicine journal. It linked endocrine-disrupting chemicals to the obesity epidemic. The scientists came across the paper while puzzling over their own research results.  None of their studies were about fat, but they had two things in common – they were all researching endocrine-disrupting chemicals, and they all ended up with unusually heavy lab animals.

Available From: 
CBC
Order Information: 
Watch online.

National Institutes of Health seminar on environmental exposures and women's health (video)

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Video
Publisher: 
National Institutes of Health (US)
Publication Date: 
2010
Publication Place: 
Bethesda, Maryland

The four topics discussed in this two-hour video are: Risks from Environmental Exposures During Pregnancy; Endocrine Disruption, Developmental Epigenetic eprogramming and Adult Cancer Risk; Environmental Aspects of Autoimmune Diseases; and Occupational Exposures and Cancer Risk: Women Are Not Just Small Men

Available From: 
Order Information: 
Available on the website and by download.

2011 bottled water scorecard

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Nneka Leiba
Sean Gray
Jane Houlihan
Publisher: 
Environmental Working Group
Publication Date: 
2011

Report on EWG’s survey of 173 unique bottled water products that found a few improvements over their 2009 Bottled Water Scorecard. Also found that there are still “too many secrets and too much advertising hype.” Discovered that 18 percent of bottled waters failed to list the source, and 32 percent disclosed nothing about the treatment or purity of the water.

Available From: 
Order Information: 
Available online.
Notes: 
Contains bibliographical references.

The gendered health effects of chronic low-dose exposures to chemicals in drinking water

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Susanne Hamm
With contributions by Troy Dixon, Bryony Halpin, Pat Hania, Laila Harris, Jyoti Phartiyal, Mary Rollins-Lorimer, and Anne Sabourin
With input from Dr. Dayna Nadine Scott, Director, NNEWH, and the Women & Water Steering Committee
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women’s Health
Publication Date: 
2009
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

Presents the results of research examining drinking water data in five case studies spanning communities across the country. The data was examined in the context of emerging epidemiological evidence on low-dose exposures and their potential health effects during key developmental and reproductive life stages that can create “windows of vulnerability” with a distinctly gendered character. Confirms that for Canadians, the quality of your drinking water, from a long-term health perspective, depends on where you live.

Order Information: 
Visit their website to download a copy.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Webinar on biomonitoring: measuring the pollution in women’s bodies to build healthier communities

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
CWHN and the National Networks on Environments and Women’s Health
Publication Date: 
2011

Presenter Sharyle Patton explores the uses of biomonitoring – the testing of one’s body for chemical exposure – and looks at how the experience of knowing one's body burden (the total amount of chemicals present in the human body at any given time) can help inform personal choice and political engagement. While the findings from biomonitoring may be devastating to some on an individual level, Patton suggests that if the information is used with sensitivity and respect for tradition, it can be quite powerful in helping groups work for change in toxic chemical policy. A storyteller, Patton illustrates her message with the experiences of women she has encountered through her work.

Order Information: 
Available online only.
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