Health status

Health status

Measuring up: a Health Canada surveillance update on Canadian children and youth

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
I.D. Rusen
Catherine McCourt
Publisher: 
Health Canada
Publication Date: 
1999
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

Presents a collection of a limited number of important child health outcomes from various surveillance programs, according to the following categories: infant health, childhood cancer, vaccine-preventable diseases, respiratory health, child injury, and HIV and sexual health.

Available From: 
ISBN/ISSN: 
CHEA.R83 1999
ISBN 0662268887

Women's health in Quebec

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Hélène Cornellier
Lise Lamontagne
Chantal Lapointe
Publisher: 
Réseau québécois d'action pour la santé des femmes
Publication Date: 
1999
Publication Place: 
Québec, QC

Presents a framework that conveys women's needs and contributes to improving their health. The report begins with a brief history of the women's health movement and the concerns that spurred it on. Then, a definition of health follows, highlighting aspects specific to women, including traditional roles and barriers, and describing the feminist approach to health. Finally, it analyses the demands and future perspectives that emerged from the consultation process undertaken by the Réseau québécois d'action pour la santé des femmes. The tables in the Appendix summarize the work stemming from the consultations and the Quebec Forum. It is a strategy to facilitate concerted action, and a way to speak out and challenge decision makers.

ISBN/ISSN: 
ISBN 2980643319
WOMH.C67 1999

The health of minority women

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Publisher: 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, The Office on Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2003
Publication Place: 
Washington, D.C.

Examines various topics regarding the health of minority women in the United States, which includes African American or Black women, Hispanic women or Latinas, Asian American women, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander women and American Indian/Alaska Native women. Looks at barriers limiting access to health care, the use of preventive health services, and health status and concerns.

Notes: 
<p>Includes bibliographical references.</p>

The Canadian girl-child: determinants of the health and well-being of girls and young women

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Author: 
Canadian Institute of Child Health
Publisher: 
Canadian Institute of Child Health
Publication Date: 
1997
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

Outlines how the Canadian Girl-Child project has taken us one step closer to uncovering the extent to which growing up female impacts the healthy development of girls and young women from birth to adulthood and to advancing the status of the girl-child in Canada. Provides a brief overview of the original goals and objectives of the project and offers some initial conclusions as to the extent to which the project was able to fulfill these expectations. Also included is the framework developed by the researcher for analysing the relationships between gender, child development and the determinants of health. Identifies key gaps in the literature and future research priorities proposed. Specific reference is made to ethno-cultural and visible minority girls and young women. Concludes with suggestions for future project development.

ISBN/ISSN: 
ISBN 0919747507

The health of Cree, Inuit and Southern Quebec women: similarities and differences

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
Centres of Excellence for Women's Health - Consortium Université de Montréal (CESAF)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Claudette Lavallée
Chantal Bourgault
Publisher: 
Canadian Journal of Public Health
Publication Date: 
2000
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

Using the data from a number of the surveys conducted over the last 10 years by Sante Quebec, this study examines the health characteristics of two populations of Aboriginal women of northern Quebec compared to those of women in the rest of the province. The northern populations had a larger proportion of young women. Aboriginal women have heavier family responsibilities than other Quebec women. Inuit women had a much higher prevalence of smoking and drug use. Alcohol consumption was less frequent in northern women, but the quantity consumed was higher compared to other Quebec women. Cree women tended to be more obese, had higher levels of blood glucose and lower levels of cholesterol. Inuit women tended to have lower rates of hypertension and higher rates of declared hearing problems and mental disorders. The similarities and differences observed among these three populations of women can assist decision-makers in setting priorities with regards to maintaining and improving their health.

Notes: 
CESAF closed its office August 31, 2001.
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