National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)

National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)

Chemical exposures of women workers in the plastics industry with particular reference to breast cancer and reproductive hazards

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Robert Dematteo
Anne Rochon Ford
Margaret M. Keith
Michael Gilbertson
James T. Brophy
Jyoti Pharityal
Anne Wordsworth
Magali Rootham
Andrew E. Watterson
Dayna Nadine Scott
Matthias Beck
Edition: 
Vol. 22(4) 427-448
Publisher: 
New Solutions (Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.)
Publication Date: 
2012

Explores the occupational exposures in producing plastics and health risks to workers, particularly women, who make up a large part of the workforce. Demonstrates that workers are exposed to chemicals that have been identified as mammary carcinogens and endocrine disrupting chemicals, and that the work environment is heavily contaminated with dust and fumes. Finds that, as a consequence, plastics workers have a body burden of environmental contaminants that far exceeds that found in the general public.

Order Information: 
Available online.
Notes: 
This research was funded by Health Canada in the form of a grant to the National Network on Environments and Women’s Health at York University and the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation–Ontario Region.

Hazardous substances: plastics

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
Canadian Auto Workers
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Ontario

Factsheet detailing the various plastics that workers may come in contact with in the auto industry, and how contact with these plastics may affect their health.

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Available online.

Chemical exposure and plastics production: issues for women's health

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Exposition à des produits chimiques et production des matières plastiques : problèmes pour la santé des femmes
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Robert DeMatteo
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

A literature review of chemical exposure and plastics production as it relates to women's health.

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Available online.
Notes: 
Contains bibliographical references.

NNEWH Plastics workshop (video series)

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2012
Publication Place: 
Windsor, ON

Fourteen videos documenting a workshop hosted by NNEWH in partnership with the Canadian Auto Workers (CAW) in January 2012 in Windsor, Ontario. The workshop dealt with recent studies on the emerging health concerns for women workers in the auto sector, specifically plastics manufacturing and the possible elevated incidence of breast cancer and reproductive problems in women plastics workers. 

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View online.

Defining endocrine disruptors: are women workers in the automotive plastics industry particularly at risk?

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2012
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

A clear language factsheet describing the possible health dangers from chemical expsurres experienced by women who work in the automotive plastics industry.  Exposures described are mainly by breathing the fumes and dusts, and also by absorption through the skin. Many of these chemicals interfere with hormone systems and are therefore called endocrine disruptors.

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Available online.

Plastics industry workers and breast cancer risk: Q & A

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Les travailleuses de l’industrie des matières plastiques et le risque du cancer du sein : Q et R
Owning Org: 
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2012
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

A question and answer format factsheet on the health issues facing women who work in industries, such as the automotive industry, in which they work with plastics. Discusses the risk of developing breast cancer due to these exposures, the current situation with occupational health standards, and what should be done to change those standards.

The gendered health effects of chronic low-dose exposures to chemicals in drinking water

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Susanne Hamm
With contributions by Troy Dixon, Bryony Halpin, Pat Hania, Laila Harris, Jyoti Phartiyal, Mary Rollins-Lorimer, and Anne Sabourin
With input from Dr. Dayna Nadine Scott, Director, NNEWH, and the Women & Water Steering Committee
Publisher: 
National Network on Environments and Women’s Health
Publication Date: 
2009
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

Presents the results of research examining drinking water data in five case studies spanning communities across the country. The data was examined in the context of emerging epidemiological evidence on low-dose exposures and their potential health effects during key developmental and reproductive life stages that can create “windows of vulnerability” with a distinctly gendered character. Confirms that for Canadians, the quality of your drinking water, from a long-term health perspective, depends on where you live.

Order Information: 
Visit their website to download a copy.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Full circle: drugs, the environment and our health (Chapter 9 of The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy)

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Sharon Batt
Publisher: 
Women's Press (Now owned by Canadian Scolar's Press)
Publication Date: 
2009
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

The Push to Prescribe: Women & Canadian Drug Policy discusses the complexity surrounding women and pharmaceuticals and uses the best evidence to argue for changes that better reflect women's needs in public health policy and that ensure those who are best suited to make these determinations are included in policy-making.

This chapter looks from a public health perspective at the trace amounts of pharmaceuticals and personal care products that have been detected in Canadian water, with particular attention to women’s relationship to this issue.

The Push to Prescribe, edited by Anne Rochon Ford and Diane Saibil and published by Women’s Press, is available at your local bookstore or can be ordered online at www.cspi.org.

This chapter is being made available by National Network on Environments and Women's Health. Please note that this chapter is for individual use only and distribution is prohibited.

Order Information: 
Available online only.

Women and water

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
The National Network on Environments and Women's Health
Publication Date: 
2010

A website that seeks to contribute to the dialogue around Canadian water policy through water research that affects women and their health. Women have historical and traditional ties and spiritual relationships with water. In this way, water is of central importance to health broadly-defined (i.e. not just physical health). However, often women are not specifically studied or physical effects on women are measured in relation to the health of their unborn and new babies. This website will explore the gendered risks to women in a country where access to safe water is often taken for granted.

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Available online only.

Webinar on biomonitoring: measuring the pollution in women’s bodies to build healthier communities

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Centres of Excellence for Womens Health (CEWH)
National Network on Environment and Women's Health (NNEWH)
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
CWHN and the National Networks on Environments and Women’s Health
Publication Date: 
2011

Presenter Sharyle Patton explores the uses of biomonitoring – the testing of one’s body for chemical exposure – and looks at how the experience of knowing one's body burden (the total amount of chemicals present in the human body at any given time) can help inform personal choice and political engagement. While the findings from biomonitoring may be devastating to some on an individual level, Patton suggests that if the information is used with sensitivity and respect for tradition, it can be quite powerful in helping groups work for change in toxic chemical policy. A storyteller, Patton illustrates her message with the experiences of women she has encountered through her work.

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Available online only.
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