Mammography

Mammography

If you have breast cancer ...

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Connie Clement
Edition: 
Vol 8, No.3
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1987
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article offers a guide to diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. Discuses non-invasive diagnostic tests available, information on recovery and healing. 

Unpacking the great mammography debate

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Déballer le grand débat sur la mammographie
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Cornelia J. Baines
Edition: 
To the Point - Guest Column
Publisher: 
CWHN
Publication Date: 
2012

Discusses the debates about mammography screening, arguing that screening can often be unnecessary and have negative impacts. Notes that screening has not reduced incidence of advanced cancers, a prerequisite for successful screening.

Mammography screening: weighing the pros and cons for women’s health

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Ann Silversides
Publisher: 
CWHN Network
Publication Date: 
Summer 2012
Publication Place: 
Winnipeg, MB

Explains the current issues with mammography scrrening and summarizes the evidence about it. Discusses the recent controversies about the guideline on screening for breast cancer for average-risk women (aged 40 to 79) that was released in late 2011 by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. This guideline updated screening recommendations made by the Task Force’s predecessor, the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Examination, in 2001. The focus of the guideline is on mammography screening, but the guideline authors also recommended against clinical breast examination (by physicians) and breast self-examination by patients. 

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Available online.

Recommendations on screening for breast cancer in average-risk women aged 40–74 years

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Author: 
The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
Publisher: 
Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ)
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

New screening guidelines in Canada that state women aged 40–74 years with average risk for breast cancer do not need mammograms as often as thought, announced November 21, 2011 by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.

The new guidelines include these recommendations for Canada:
- women under age 50 who are at an average risk of developing breast cancer should not have routine mammograms
- clinical breast exams and self-exams have no benefit and shouldn’t be used
- women aged 50 to 69 who are at an average risk should have mammograms every two to three years, instead of every year or two
- women aged 70 to 74 who are at an average risk should have mammograms every two to three years (previous guidelines didn’t recommend screening for that age group)

The recommendations don’t apply to women with an elevated risk of breast cancer, such as those with a history of the disease in a first-degree relative or those with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

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Order Information: 
Visit their website to download a copy.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Highlights of Breast cancer screening : women’s experience of awaiting a diagnosis

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Dépistage du cancer du sein : ce que vivent les femmes en attente d'un diagnostic
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Patricia Pineault
Lise Goulet
Isabelle Mimeault
Publisher: 
Réseau québécois d'action pour la santé des femmes
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Place: 
Montreal, QC

Discusses a study done in 2003 of women in Montreal who were waiting the results of their breast cancer screening. All participants received abnormal mammographic screening results and had to undergo additional examinations before obtaining the final diagnosis received an evaluation questionnaire.

The conclusions of the RQASF’s evaluation coincide with other research on anxiety experienced by women during the breast cancer screening and investigation process. Of particular note is that while the support of family and friends comforts women, it does not significantly reduce the level of anxiety of participants in the screening program.Only early support from health professionals diminishes their anxiety and prevents it from continuing through the subsequent stages. The fundamental role of physicians in providing support to women was strikingly clear. Another major element is the close relationship between emotional and informational support.

Order Information: 
Available online.
ISBN/ISSN: 
ISBN 2-923269-03-9
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Mammography

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
Health Canada

Discusses when to have a mammogram, what is a mammogram, what to expect, mammograms and radiation, minimizing the risk of breast cancer, and the government of Canada's role.

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Healthy Navajo women: walk in beauty

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Publisher: 
Ramah Band of Navajo Indians and the Albuquerque Area Indian Health Board
Publication Date: 
2006
Publication Place: 
New Mexico

Presents a health promotion video, aimed at American Indian women, to build community awareness of breast and cervical cancer.

Breast health: what you can do

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Publisher: 
Canadian Cancer Society
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

Explains how women can take charge of their breast health through breast self-examination and breast screening tests. Includes answers to frequently asked questions.

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Breast health: what you can do (Chinese)

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Resource Language: 
Chinese
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Publisher: 
Canadian Cancer Society
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

Explains, in Chinese, how women can take charge of their breast health through breast self-examination and breast screening tests. Includes answers to frequently asked questions.

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Breast health: what you can do (Punjabi)

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Resource Language: 
Punjabi
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Publisher: 
Canadian Cancer Society
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

Explains, in Punjabi, how women can take charge of their breast health through breast self-examination and breast screening tests. Includes answers to frequently asked questions.

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