Childbirth planning

Childbirth planning

In praise of midwifery

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Christina Starr
Edition: 
Vol 12, No.1
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1991
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article explores the history of choices in childbirth. Shares one woman's home birth experience. 

Midwifery: from recognition to regulation - the perils of government intervention

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Mary Neilans
Edition: 
Vol 13, No.2
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1992
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article discusses new midwifery legislation and the side effects of government recognition. Illustrates the unique and valuable role of a midwife. 

 


Long distance delivery

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Dianne Lai
Holly Rupert
Edition: 
Vol 10, No.1
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1988
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article speaks to the unfortunate effects of regionalization on women's health. Indicates how regionalization shapes the birth experiences of women in many areas of Canada. Introduces The Project on Out-of-Town Birth research project.  A survey of health professionals reviewed. 

Birthing options

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Madeline Boscoe
Kathleen McDonnell
Edition: 
Vol. 1, N. 1
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1979
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article discusses the continued struggle of the medicalization of birth for families, questions promising alternative birthing options and whether they have the capacity to bring about concrete change and questions the accessibility of these new birthing options; suggests systemic shifts are still needed.

Birth spacing: three to five saves lives

Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large
Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Author: 
Vidya Setty-Venugopal
Ushma D. Upadhyay
Publisher: 
Population Reports
Publication Date: 
2002
Publication Place: 
Baltimore, ML

Explores evidence suggesting that 3 to 5 years is the optimum spacing time between births for the health of both mother and children.

Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.
Syndicate content