Les Ressources

Launch: Women's Health Circles Handbook and the companion Key to Women's Health: Stroke Resource Guide

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The Women's Health Circles Handbook demonstrates approaches from three
pilot sites to coordinating and conducting Health Circles and offers
examples to help you meet the needs of women in your community.

The Key to Women's Health: Stroke Resource Guide illustrates how to link
discussions on the social determinants of health or other topics chosen
by women attending Women's Health Circles to the risk factors, signs and
symptoms of stroke.

Date: March 31, 2009
Time: 9:30 am - 11:00 am
Location: Parliament Library
269 Gerrard St. East (just west of Parliament), Toronto
2nd floor, Community Room

For more information please contact: Ontario Women's Health Network at
owhn@owhn.on.ca or 416-408-4840















Gendering the Health Determinants Framework: Why Girls' and Women's Health Matters

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This new primer from the Women’s Health Research Network seeks to clarify the concepts in the health determinants framework (HDF) and to examine its usefulness in understanding the health of girls and women — a unique population group that faces “disadvantage due to structural inequities that limit their access to, and control over, material and symbolic resources, and over their bodies and lives.”

Click here to download it now!

Intersectionality: Moving Women's Health Research and Policy Forward

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New, from the Women’s Health Research Network, a primer for women’s health researchers on how to apply an intersectional framework in their work.

 “For those working in the areas of gender and women’s health, intersectionality can be used for studying, understanding, and responding to the ways in which sex and gender intersect with other variables and how these intersections contribute to unique experiences of health. This perspective reveals that, while sex and gender are important considerations, one should never assume that they are the most important categories for conducting health research or for developing, implementing, or evaluating policy. In short, an intersectional framework can be thought of as the next step in the evolution of women’s health research and policy.”

Visit the download page to download the primer.

Women's Healthy Environments Network latest newsletter

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Women's Healthy Environments Network’s winter 2009 newsletter is now out. See Volume 3, Issue 1, Winter 2009, WHEN Newsletter (PDF Format).

Death by Prescription: A Father Takes on His Daughter's Killer

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Terence Young's book, "Death by Prescription: A Father Takes on His Daughter's Killer - The Multi-Billion Dollar Pharmaceutical Companies", was published by Key Porter Books this month. According to the publisher's website and amazon.ca, it is only available for pre-order. It has already received a very favourable review in Quill and Quire.

Too Much Homework?

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A study titled Trouble at the Border?: Gender, Work, and the Work-Home Interface, by University of Toronto sociology Professor Scott Schieman with Paul Glavin, found that workers with the most job autonomy and work schedule control were more likely to bring extra work home with them. "Generally, people who had more schedule control and job autonomy had more work-family role blurring, and that's a big predictor of stress for most people. It's also a key indicator of work-family conflict," Schieman said.

See the abstract for Trouble at the Border?: Gender, Work and the Work-Home Interface.

Social Determinants of Health: Canadian Perspectives, Second Edition

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Genetics and traditional risk factors such as activity, diet, and tobacco use cannot reliably predict whether we stay healthy or become ill. What then are the primary predictors of adult-onset diabetes, heart attacks, stroke, and many other diseases? The social determinants of health provide the answer: these are the socio-economic conditions that shape the health of individuals, communities, and jurisdictions as a whole. Social determinants establish the extent to which Canadians possess the resources to identify and achieve personal aspirations, satisfy needs, and cope with the environment. This perspective is the key to understanding patterns of health and illness in Canada today.

Editor Dennis Raphael is a Professor at the School of Health Policy and Management at York University.

For more information, see Social Determinants of Health

Breaking Barriers, Not Bones

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Breaking Barriers, Not Bones by Osteoporosis Canada is the first large-scale national report card of its kind to assess and grade Canadians’ access to BMD testing and osteoporosis medications on provincial/territorial drug benefit plans across the country.  The report, released on November 24, 2008, also looks at various provincial initiatives undertaken to help in the care of osteoporosis.  

Read Breaking Barriers, Not Bones (pdf).

Primary Health Care Indicators Chartbook

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The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) has released a new report from its Primary Health Care Information (PHCi) program. Primary Health Care Indicators Chartbook: An Illustrative Example of Using PHC Data for Indicator Reporting is a first in Canada, showing how primary health care (PHC) information can be used to populate PHC indicators and better understand access, recommended care as well as organization and service delivery.

For more information about the new PHCi program, or to download a chartbook slide deck of figures, please visit CIHI or email phc@cihi.ca .

Voices of Our Sisters In Spirit: A Research and Policy Report

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Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC) draws attention to Aboriginal women's and girls' experiences of racialized, sexualized violence that leads to their disappearance or murder, and share research findings with those most affected: families and communities.   

This report contains the life stories of Aboriginal women and girls as shared with NWAC by their families. Initial demographic and statistical research results and information on NWAC's key and emerging policy areas are included.

NWAC's Sisters In Spirit initiative works to show the media, justice community and society at large that Aboriginal women and girls are loved. Its aim is to ensure that missing and murdered women and girls and their families are treated with dignity and that their cases are assigned the priority they deserve.

Read Our Sisters In Spirit: A Research and Policy Report .

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