News and Issues

U.S. court strikes down age limits on Plan B

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

A federal judge in the U.S. has ordered that Plan B, the most common morning-after pill, be made available over the counter for all ages, instead of requiring a prescription for girls 16 and younger.

Read the story (New York Times).

Read Our Bodies, Our Blog’s commentary on this, The Long Political History of Increasing Access to Emergency Contraception.

And for a Canadian perspective... CWHN worked with our partner Women and Health protection over the past decade to increase and improve access to ECP in Canada. Read about it here

Some Alysena 28 birth control pills recalled in Canada

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

If you are taking the birth control pill Alysena 28 day, be sure to check the lot number on your package as soon as possible. 

Apotex, the pill’s manufacturer is urgently recalling packages with the Lot number LF 01899A. One package of this lot in Eastern Canada was found to contain two weeks of placebo (sugar pills), when it should have contained only one week.

Read the story (Global News).

Read Health Canada’s recall notice.

Is autism related to antidepressants in pregnancy?

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

Autism Awareness Day was this week, raising awareness of how widespread autism has become. A story on the RxISK website raises the question of whether SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) antidepressants could be linked to the rise in autism rates.

SSRI's have been used since 1987 and women of childbearing age make up a large portion of antidepressant users.

Autism is now estimated to affect 1 in 50 children, according to the US Centers for Disease Control.

“Available scientific data from animal and human studies raise serious concerns that exposure to SSRIs during pregnancy damages the developing brain and may cause neurodevelopmental abnormalities, including autism,” writes Adam Urato, the Chairman of Obstetrics and Gynecology at MetroWest Medical Center in Framingham, Massachusetts, as well as a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, Massachusetts. 

Read the story.

New CIHR Chairs In Gender, Work and Health

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

The Canadian Instititutes of Health Research (CIHR) have awarded nine new research chairs in Gender, Work and Health. The Gender, Work and Health Chair opportunity was launched by the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health in partnership with the CIHR Institute of Musculoskeletal Health and Arthritis, the CIHR Institute of Population and Public Health, the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety and the Institut de recherche Robert-Sauvé en santé et en sécurité du travail.

The specific objectives of the Gender, Work and Health Chair Program are:

  • To support leading researchers to develop their programs of research in gender, work and health.
  • To build capacity for research on work and health that accounts for gender and sex.
  • To foster the translation of that research into gender- and sex-sensitive policies and interventions that improve workers' health.

The overall value of this investment is $7.2 million, with each chair valued at $800,000 over five years. A unique feature of this Chair Program is a knowledge translation (KT) partnership with the Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety (CCOHS), a not-for-profit federal department corporation mandated to promote the total well-being of working Canadians. CCOHS will be the official KT Partner for the Gender, Work and Health Chairs. Using web-based technology and their extensive network, CCOHS will expand the reach and impact of the Chairs’ work.

Read full list of awardees and their project abstracts. 

Sex and gender reporting in health research

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

and why Canada should be a leader.

Dr. Joy Johnson, Scientific Director of the CIHR Institute of Gender and Health and Dr. Alain Beaudet, President of CIHR, have co-authored a commentary entitled ‘Sex and Gender Reporting in Health Research: Why Canada Should Be a Leader’. The commentary speaks to advances made by Canadian funding agencies to encourage health researchers to take up sex and gender issues, and encourages Canada’s leading health research journals to follow suit. The commentary was published online in the January/February 2013, Vol.104, No.1 issue of the Canadian Journal of Public Health.

CWHN article wins “Best Online Story”!

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

Ann Silversides has won an award for her excellent article on the pros and cons of mammography that she wrote CWHN’s Network in 2012.

Mammography screening: Weighing the pros and cons for women’s health has been awarded “Best Online Story” in 2012 by The Registered Nurses Association of Ontario (RNAO).

Our congratulations to author Ann Silversides!

CWHN Sponsored: 
CWHN Sponsored

Ovarian cancer treatment flaws widespread in US

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

A recent study has found that there are widespread problems in how ovarian cancer is treated in the U.S. The U.S. based study found that most women with ovarian cancer there receive inadequate care.

Read the story in the New York Times, Widespread Flaws Found in Ovarian Cancer Treatment

The CWHN asked Kelly Grover of Ovarian Cancer Canada to comment about whether this study also reflects the state of ovarian cancer treatment in Canada. Grover noted that “similar issues around treatment persist in Canada, although we don't know the extent of it without research comparable to this study being done here.”

CWHN comments on Diane-35 in CMAJ

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

The Canadian Medical Association Journal recently quoted CWHN's Executive Director Anne Rochon Ford in an article discussing the dangers of Diane-35. This prescription drug, manufactured by Bayer, is a hormonal treatment prescribed to treat acne and is commonly prescribed "off label" as an oral contraceptive.

At the end of January 2013 the National Agency for the Safety of Drugs and Health Products (ANSM) in France stopped sales of the drug Diane-35 due to safety concerns, including the deaths of four women from blood clots. At the same time, Health Canada announced that it will review the safety of Diane-35 in Canada in light of the decision in France. 

Read Scrutiny of Diane-35 due to potential dangers of off-label prescribing in the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), February 19, 2013.

Read about the French decision in the Telegraph and about Health Canada's announcement on the CBC website.

And read about the work of CWHN's partner Women and Health Protection in 2004 related to the safety concerns about Diane-35.

Breast cancer survival rates – and how stats can mislead

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

A recent article in HealthNewsReview (a site that examines the accuracy of health news reports) shines a light on misleading stats that are being used to promote mammography.

CWHN has covered this issue recently. Learn more about the controversies about breast screening here:

Mammography screening: Weighing the pros and cons for women’s health

Breast self-examination: What it means and why the thinking about it has changed

Read more about breast health and breast cancer on our website:

Women, Plastics and Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Prevention

Not a flower shop: Exploring breast cancer risk and gender bias

Book Review - Breasts: A Natural and Unnatural History by Florence Williams

Being proactive about your breast health

Silent Killer: New video on plastics and breast cancer

Tagged :
Print
Text Size: Normal / Medium / Large

A short video by Operation Maple explains clearly some of the recent ground-breaking research in Canada linking women who work in plastics manufacturing with higher rates of breast cancer.

Featured are Robert DeMatteo and James Brophy who, with Margaret Keith, partnered with The National Network on Environments and Women's Health (NNEWH) to study health risks of women working in the automotive plastics workers in the Windsor, Ontario region.

Watch the video on YouTube.

Read more about the NNEWH research on our website: Women, Plastics and Breast Cancer.

Syndicate content