News and Issues

December 6th is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women

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CWHN highlights some of the activities for remembrance and action

(Original rose button distributed by YWCA Canada since 1991)


Rose Campaign – YWCA Canada  (since 1991)

Canadian Labour Congress commemorates National Day of Remembrance and Action

“December 6, Remembrance is Not Enough”, an article by Jody Dallaire of New Brunswick, published in the online magazine, Straight Goods.

Purple Ribbon Campaign Against Violence in Prince Edward Island (since 1991) 

 

See also, CWHN "There's no place like home" poster and other resources on domestic violence.

NWAC launching HIV prevention tool for Aboriginal women and Girls

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December 1 is the beginning of Aboriginal AIDS Awareness Week, and this week the Native Women’s Association of Canada will be launching their new HIV prevention and stigma reduction tool for young women and girls.

NWAC announced the upcoming launch of TIPI Dreams: Transforming Indigenous Power Inside-out in a press release yesterday.

Read about it on NWAC's website.

Read more about Aboriginal AIDS Awareness Week on the website of Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network (CAAN) .

Questioning drugs to treat "female orgasmic disorder"

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A new CBC Radio podcast highlights the arguments for and against the use of testosterone to treat a condition that is being called “female orgasmic disorder”. Trials of this hormone on women are now being carried out in Canada.

Critics say this disorder does not exist, and that is a marketing ploy by drug companies.

Listen for Barbara Mintzes’ critique of the trials. Mintzes, a drug assessment specialist, is co-author of the book, Sex, Lies, and Pharmaceuticals: How Drug Companies Plan to Profit from Female Sexual Dysfunction. 

Listen to the CBC podcast, originally broadcast on the Current on November 21, 2012

Read the CBC story.

Learn more about the medicalization of women’s sexuality in a webinar CWHN sponsored featuring Barbara Mintzes.

New study shows higher breast cancer risk in some workplaces

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A new Canadian study demonstrates that women working in particular occupations have an increased risk of developing breast cancer. 

Read the press release from The National Network on Environments and Women's Health, and find the summary and study on our website.

Call for action on toxic exposures in global electronics industry

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The American Public Health Association (APHA) is calling for actions on toxic exposures in fast growing global electronics industry.

Last week the APHA called on the global electronics’ industry, public health officials and international agencies to step up efforts to protect workers and communities, citing well documented adverse health effects caused by many toxic chemicals used in the manufacture of electronic and electrical products worldwide.

“The rapid growth of the electronics industry has been accompanied by massive increased use of toxic chemical substances and an increase in adverse health outcomes during manufacturing and end of life stages,” said Joe DiGangi, PhD, IPEN. “Manufacturers need to address this problem up front in the design phase by reducing and eliminating toxic chemicals.”

In making its recommendations, APHA noted the dramatic increase in the production and use of electrical and electronic products, including a global supply chain that works through a complicated web of subcontractors, often located in Asia.

Read their press release.

 

Wide poverty gap between women and men

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A recent article in The Atlantic talks about the poverty gap between men and women in the US and elsewhere in developed nations.

The author looks at the data from 2008 across the OECD's 34 developed nations, and found that more women were poor than men at every age, and that, on average, there was an even wider gap in the U.S.

Read the article.

Sexy breast cancer campaigns: Is there a problem?

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Are ad campaigns and fundraisers called "Booby Ball" or "I Love Boobies!" offensive, insensitive, and sexist?

Listen to the heated debate on last week’s CBC show The Current, about breast cancer fundraising campaigns that use the breast to titillate.

Sexy Breast Cancer campaigns: Are we saving breasts or women's lives?

 

Common household chemicals associated with early menopause

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A study released this week has found that exposure to some common chemicals  known as endocrine disruptors  - found in plastic bottles, cleaning products, make-up and pesticides - are associated with early menopause.

Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals Lead to Earlier Age Of Menopause:  A Cross-Sectional Study Using the US Population-Based NHANES Database, was presented this week at the 68th Annual Meeting of the American Society For Reproductive Medicine.

Linda Giudice, MD, PhD, President-elect of ASRM, noted, “Endocrine-disrupting chemicals are pervasive in our environment and we do not yet know their full impact on human health and reproduction.  Studies like this give additional reason to advise patients to take what steps they can to minimize their exposures.”

Read more about it here.

Learn more the effects of about endocrine-disrupting plastics on women's health in CWHN's recent article, Not a flower shop: Exploring breast cacner risk and gender bias.

Little Pink Lies told in October

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Breast Cancer Action Montreal has launched a new campaign this year to counteract the myths about breast cancer and breast cancer campaigns that proliferate in the pink month of October.

Read about these Little Pink Lies on their website.

More Aboriginal women in prison, and more are self-harming

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A report released last week shows that the rate of women, and in particular, Aboriginal women, in prisons has risen at an alarming rate in recent years. Marginalized: The Aboriginal Women's experience in Federal Corrections by The Correctional Service of Canada also finds that the rate of self-injury among Aboriginal women inmates has soared, with the biggest spike on the Prairies. The report reveals that incidents of self-inflicted injury involving Aboriginal women have risen from just 8 in 2006 to 214 last year. 

Read more about this report here:

Female native inmates on rise: Federal report sheds light on soaring rate (Winnipeg Free Press)

Prisoner self-injury on the rise in Canada (CBC)

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