Alternatives to surgery

New research and treatments for endometriosis

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Paper
Author: 
Carolyn DeMarco
Edition: 
Vol 12, No.1
Publisher: 
Women Healthsharing
Publication Date: 
1991
Publication Place: 
Toronto, ON

This article discusses emdometriosis. Shares new research and treatment options. 

Book review - The UNhysterectomy

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Resource Language: 
English
Owning Org: 
Canadian Women's Health Network (CWHN)
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Zelda Abramson
Publisher: 
Canadian Women's Health Network
Publication Date: 
2012

Reviews the book The UNhysterectomy: Solving Your Painful, Heavy Bleeding Without Major Surgery by Holly Bridges. Bridges argues for a rethinking of gynecologists’ aggressive approaches to treating women’s gynaecological problems, in particular heavy menstrual bleeding. Using her personal story as well as other case studies, Bridges shows that heavy menstrual bleeding can be successfully treated through minimally invasive surgery. Compared to hysterectomy, the recovery time is much quicker and there are many fewer short and long-term side effects.

Order Information: 
Available online.

Recommendations on screening for breast cancer in average-risk women aged 40–74 years

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Author: 
The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.
Publisher: 
Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ)
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

New screening guidelines in Canada that state women aged 40–74 years with average risk for breast cancer do not need mammograms as often as thought, announced November 21, 2011 by The Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.

The new guidelines include these recommendations for Canada:
- women under age 50 who are at an average risk of developing breast cancer should not have routine mammograms
- clinical breast exams and self-exams have no benefit and shouldn’t be used
- women aged 50 to 69 who are at an average risk should have mammograms every two to three years, instead of every year or two
- women aged 70 to 74 who are at an average risk should have mammograms every two to three years (previous guidelines didn’t recommend screening for that age group)

The recommendations don’t apply to women with an elevated risk of breast cancer, such as those with a history of the disease in a first-degree relative or those with mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes.

Available From: 
Order Information: 
Visit their website to download a copy.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Highlights of Breast cancer screening : women’s experience of awaiting a diagnosis

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
Dépistage du cancer du sein : ce que vivent les femmes en attente d'un diagnostic
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Patricia Pineault
Lise Goulet
Isabelle Mimeault
Publisher: 
Réseau québécois d'action pour la santé des femmes
Publication Date: 
2004
Publication Place: 
Montreal, QC

Discusses a study done in 2003 of women in Montreal who were waiting the results of their breast cancer screening. All participants received abnormal mammographic screening results and had to undergo additional examinations before obtaining the final diagnosis received an evaluation questionnaire.

The conclusions of the RQASF’s evaluation coincide with other research on anxiety experienced by women during the breast cancer screening and investigation process. Of particular note is that while the support of family and friends comforts women, it does not significantly reduce the level of anxiety of participants in the screening program.Only early support from health professionals diminishes their anxiety and prevents it from continuing through the subsequent stages. The fundamental role of physicians in providing support to women was strikingly clear. Another major element is the close relationship between emotional and informational support.

Order Information: 
Available online.
ISBN/ISSN: 
ISBN 2-923269-03-9
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.
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