La vie saine

Preventing obesity in women of all ages: a public health priority

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Resource Language: 
English
Media Type: 
Online
Author: 
Catherine Lombard
Helena Teede
Edition: 
Volume 54, Special Issue
Publisher: 
Diabetes Voice, pp. 23-25
Publication Date: 
May 2009
Publication Place: 
Brussels, Belgium

Discusses how no risk factor or disease association is stronger than the link between obesity and type 2 diabetes, and that women are far more likely than men to develop type 2 diabetes if they are overweight or obese.

Order Information: 
Visit their website to download or to read online.
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.

Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance

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Organization Type: 
NGO - Non Government Organization
Service Language: 
English
Services Provided: 
Research
Community education/development
Advocacy
Policy development

A collaboration of consumer, provider, government, labor, business, health insurers and quality-of-care organizations united to drive innovative and practical strategies that combat obesity. The Alliance Steering Committee is comprised of a variety of public and private sector organizations including the American Diabetes Association, American Heart Association, America’s Health Insurance Plans, American Medical GroupAssociation, Canyon Ranch Institute, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity and Obesity (DNPAO) and others.  The Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance receives funding from founding sponsor, sanofi-aventis U.S. LLC, and supporting sponsors, Allergan, Inc. and Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc.  

Contact Info

Obesity in Canada

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Resource Language: 
English
Translated Title: 
L’obésité au Canada
Media Type: 
Paper
Online
Publisher: 
Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information
Publication Date: 
2011
Publication Place: 
Ottawa, ON

Finds some significant differences between women and men when looking at obesity, showing, for example, that income is more strongly related to obesity for women than for men. Also finds that income, rural residence and minority status (mainly Aboriginal) are related to obesity in women and men even when controlling for health (or lifestyle) behaviours, such as inactivity, fruit and vegetable consumption and alcohol use. Their analysis of obesity is limited, as the authors note, by fact that data on “access to healthy foods and food outlets, consumption of traditional diets, caloric density, marketing of foods and beverages high in sugar and fat to children, and portion sizes have not been considered in the analysis.” The report was also limited by other factors, such as the fact that those not reporting body mass index (BMI) measurement (e.g. pregnant women) were excluded

Available From: 
Order Information: 
Visit their website to read the report online or to download a copy.
ISBN/ISSN: 
ISBN: 978-1-100-18133-2
Notes: 
Includes bibliographical references.
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